Les Arts Gstaad : The People’s Choice?

 

C_LesArtsGstaad-Modell-19_5sp

Text: Alexis Munier

Photos: Les Arts Gstaad

 

The controversial Les Arts Gstaad project has received a preliminary stamp of approval by the cantonal and municipal authorities, but its greatest challenge may still lie ahead – with the people of the Saanenland. 

The project’s building ordinance was made available for public assessment in February– and the debate is expected to be a heated one.

“The Foundation Board of Les Arts Gstaad is looking forward to the debate on a project that represents a unique opportunity for the region,” says Foundation Board Chairman J. Markus Kappeler.

Located in the village centre near the railway station, the proposed cultural centre would host a wide selection of events, including but not limited to concerts, art exhibitions and conferences. Les Arts Gstaad’s goals may be lofty – to enrich the future of the Saanen region culturally, and economically – but fulfilling those goals may be difficult, given the uproar over the design, scope, and expense of the project. 

 

What’s Not to Like?

Led by acclaimed architect Rudy Ricciotti, the Foundation Board and the team have envisioned a grotto-like, ultra-modern complex that many locals consider at odds with the Old World charm of Gstaad. Moreover, opponents insist that the approximately 150 million-franc price tag is painfully steep for a theatre and conference centre they believe too ambitious to succeed here.

The 1,200-seat comprehensive concert hall is a whopping 25 meters high, encompassing the space from the ground floor to the second upper floor. It is designed to look like a grotto in a rock face resembling a crystal cave, an effect achieved by light-filled, open, jagged planes with relief recesses up to 40 centimetres deep. 

“It’s an eyesore, not to mention it will wipe out an entire residential neighbourhood,” says Anita Heutschi, one of the more outspoken opponents who lives near the site of the proposed project. “Les Arts Gstaad cultural centre does not belong here.” 

But Kappeler insists that it’s a design that ensures outstanding acoustics. “This is a completely new approach,” Kappeler says. “The acoustic quality has highest priority.”

Not surprisingly, the architect disagrees with this assessment as well.

“Nothing could be further from the truth,” defends Ricciotti, lead architect of Les Arts Gstaad. “It is a project that integrates with respect and humility… but does not strain its rural and alpine surroundings.” 

Ricciotti is perhaps best known for his Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations in Marseilles, the cultural and tourist magnet whose success Les Arts Gstaad supporters hope to replicate here. 

That said, the public has not been shy about voicing its misgivings, albeit anonymously.

“I am just the tip of the iceberg,” says Heutschi. “When I speak out against the project, I speak for many residents who remain silent for fear stating their disapproval will make them pariahs.” 

 

Changes in Infrastructure

With the Les Arts Gstaad project come a number of other changes. Access (tunnel Schützen roundabout - Les Arts Gstaad site), the bus station, car parking spaces and improvements to the Montreux–Oberland Bernois (MOB) railway track route, the extension of the platforms and a second passageway are all part of the building ordinance as well. Project managers say Les Arts Gstaad will simultaneously provide infrastructure and public transport improvements for both Saanen and Gstaad, but that is not an opinion shared by all.

“The traffic is already horrendous during the December holidays – now imagine adding an active concert schedule that week,” says Heutschi. “The tourbuses and hired vehicles which require large amounts of space will all be parked on the Bahnhofplatz, making the situation worse for the pubic.” 

The land on which Les Arts Gstaad would sit is currently partly owned by the municipality and partly by the MOB, and was secured by two purchase rights agreements registered in the land registry in favour of Les Arts Gstaad Foundation. The car park and the bus station would be taken over by the municipality and the authorities would also ensure public transport connections. The contractual cornerstones for these obligations are likewise stipulated in the overall project. In addition, the project managers of Les Arts Gstaad would also take precautions to exclude unnecessary risks in construction costs: The estimated construction costs for the centre as well as the tunnel will hit 100 million francs. Currently, sufficient resources for the further development of the project are available to take it through the approval stage. 

 

Who’s for Les Arts Gstaad

Les Arts Gstaad took root in 2005 and has relied on generous financial donors for support. 

“We are convinced that the inhabitants of the Saanen region believe in the future of this region as we do,” states Kappeler. “It is a project of the century, which had to be carefully developed step by step.”

Les Arts Gstaad is certainly not lacking supporters. A wide selection of artists, museum professionals and politicians have pledged their support and for the project, describing it a unique opportunity for the region. Supporters emphasise the building’s importance in the fields of music, art, dance and ballet, as well as for the entire Saanenland. 

“It’s key that Les Arts Gstaad also wishes to be a centre for dance performance, since Switzerland has developed into a veritable ‘dance country’,” says Saanen-native and Artistic Director of the Holland Dance Festival Samuel Würsten.

The “Gstaad 2020+” association is also on record as in favour of the project, as are some Swiss politicians like Erich von Siebenthal, National Councillor. “The region needs forward-looking and visionary projects like this to attract tourists,” explains von Siebenthal, “If we do not seize the opportunity, others will.” 

Kappeler cites project studies that show a potentially positive effect on the Saanenland, and for local tourism. “If we are good,” Kappeler says, “we could organize many concerts per year. With top-class exhibits, we could attract hundreds of visitors per day.” 

Exhibitions are planned in a large showroom. The Foundation Board also envisions events such as readings, literary award ceremonies and festivals, as well as general assemblies, small congresses, or the Gstaadermesse.

“We are paving the way for a year-round attractive offering for guests and for locals,” he says. 

 

Verdict: Next Steps in the Approval Process

The building ordinance for development plan no. 79 “Les Arts/Ried,” along with building permit applications and any associated plans and documents, together with the preliminary report by the authorities, was made available in February at the Saanen municipal office. Any objections to the project were submitted in writing with appropriate reasoning within the same period.

As required by law, the municipality will now consult with any objectors, and is prepared to schedule sufficient time for this process. On completion of these negotiations, the municipality will issue an invitation to the public for a public meeting 30 days prior to taking any decision on the project. Following this vote by the population, the matter goes to the Office for Local and Regional Planning (AGR) for approval.

If You Build It, They Will Come

You can’t make an omelette without breaking a few eggs, goes the old saying. While Les Arts Gstaad may be considered unappealing by some, other famous structures suffered the same scrutiny upon their construction – the Eiffel Tower to name just one. Gustave Eiffel didn’t let public scrutiny stop him; while leaders at the time cried the structure would make a laughingstock of Paris, the Eiffel Tower is now a beloved symbol of the French nation. 

But some residents believe the large structure will detract from Gstaad’s quaint village atmosphere.

“The Saanenland would benefit greatly from a new arts centre, but the current proposal would be an aesthetic and economic disaster,“ says a long time Gstaad resident who did not wish to be named. “Economically, 1200 seats is not commercially viable. A maximum 500-seat auditorium for chamber music would be more suitable. Aesthetically, the current proposal is an unattractive structure – too big, out of character for its location next to the train station, and squeezed into a site that is just not large enough. 

Yet despite the naysayers, the Foundation Board of Les Arts Gstaad prefers to dream big, and promises big rewards in return. Les Arts Gstaad has the potential to usher in a new era for the Saanenland, bringing Gstaad securely into the limelight for the first time since its glory days in the 1960’s. Yet fears that success would turn the region into just another ritzy resort devoid of charm abound.

Will the oversized cultural centre fill these Alpine hills with the sound of music, or will these attempts fall flat, leaving an unfinished, bankrupt eyesore blemishing the landscape? Saanenland's residents will soon decide.

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 4)

The Saanenland – A Mecca for Private Education

C_Gstaad_Internat_Campus

Photo: AvS

Text: Sophie Green

 

Nestled in the heart of this magical valley, elite private schools have been attracting students from around world for half a century. 

In addition to increasing the local economy in the short-term by creating jobs and the purchase of local goods, the schools have a lasting financial impact on Gstaad. For many students, their time here is more than just a several-year sojourn – they fall in love with the Saanenland and even years later, a yearning for this “home away from home” beckons them to return.

Though the majority of the students are boarding, the rise in popularity of day-school programs has prompted many families to settle in the region. Even boarding students at schools like Le Rosey and the John F Kennedy International School often have a chalet or apartment in the Saanenland, in which family members stay to remain close-by. 

 

To Each (School) His Own

Of the four international schools in the region, each offers a unique educational programme, marrying first-rate academics with cultural and sporting activities. 

“We have many students enrolled in our day-school, and whose families have relocated to the Saanenland specifically for enrolment,” says Headmaster Andrew Croft of the John F Kennedy International School. “Saanen provides the ideal backdrop for a well-rounded education. 

The students participate in a myriad of outdoor activities, as well as being exposed to the region’s traditions and handicrafts; visits to the farmers, cheese-makers and wood-carvers are all part of the cultural programme. In honour of the current Winter Olympics in Sochi, the school has created its own Olympics-inspired event, which has been sponsored by a number of Saanenland businesses, highlighting a strong bond between the local and international.

Smaller, boarding-only schools like the Gstaad International School provide another option for discerning parents.

“We offer personalized education within a strong family atmosphere, where each child is given enough individual attention enabling them to succeed,” says Christopher Sanderson, Headmaster. 

The school recently invested in the Alpine Lodge, where they have built their new campus – a positive aspect for the local economy. 

“We are firmly rooted in the Saanenland and residents have responded very positively to our development plan,” insists Sanderson. “They see the benefit it will bring for employment and business in the area.”

 

Old timers and Newcomers

The prestigious Le Rosey has decamped to Gstaad each winter for a century. There is even an annual alumni reunion in Gstaad each year for these Roseans, giving old school friends the chance to get together and enjoy themselves. Le Rosey claims it provides its pupils with friends for life and, indeed, once grown, the children’s love for the valley often inspires them to continue to holiday here or build a home in the Saanenland.

The newest addition to the aforementioned trio of private schools in the Saanenland is the Oxford International College Switzerland. Though technically in the nearby Pays d’en Haut, the school’s campus in Château d’Oex is the latest extension of its parent school started in Oxford, UK in 2003. OICS’s innovative programme blends the highly effective academic tutorial system with mentorships between professor and student, with a boutique boarding school atmosphere. 

“It was an easy decision to place such a small and tailored programme here in the region,” states Aaron Schmidtberger, Head of School. “This amazing location, the Swiss reputation for quality education and the existence of other world-renowned schools make it the perfect setting for OICS. We hope to serve both international families and locals here for generations to come.”

 

Indoors, Outdoors

Not just schools bring students to the area: Summer camps bring short-term students and visitors to the region as well. Lovell Camps, with both their winter and summer programs for children from 2-16 years old welcomes over 400 children from over 30 nationalities to the Saanenland each year. Almost all of the camp’s supplies and activities are provided by local firms, giving an economic boost to the region. Run by the Lovell family, founders of the John F. Kennedy International School, the camps are now hosting the third generation of participants. 

The outdoor activities provided by all the schools and camps are second-to-none. From rock-climbing on the commanding Videmanette to canoeing adventures on Lake Lauenen, the Saanenland’s beauty is on display all year-round. In winter, Eggli is the perfect piste for winter races, while in summer the steep hike to Rellerli is awash with wildflowers. Each and every child lucky enough to experience schooling in the Saanenland is spoilt for choice of an outdoor adventure. 

 

Back to the Future

Fast-forward twenty years and you’ll find the former students of these private schools are back to stay. Whether for just a few weeks in winter, or for months on end, these adoring alumni return to the Saanenland. Taking advantage of regional fine food and hospitality, as well as the outdoors, they bring their business to the region year after year.

As the next generation of students here graduate and go off to university abroad, the bonds they’ve formed endure. Years may go by, and children blossom into full-grown adults, yet the Saanenland has secured a special place in their hearts and minds. No matter where in the world they may live, this deep-rooted yearning for their “home away from home” beckons them to return – and they do, with open arms.

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 2)

In the Name of the Father (& Son)

 

Gudins2def

 

Photo: Adrià Lucas García González

Interview: Januaria Piromallo

 

Le Rosey's Philippe Gudin Places School Firmly in Son Christophe’s Hands

For a hundred years, Le Rosey has called Gstaad its winter home. Every January, the school moves its 400 students from the main campus in Rolle, built on a 14th-century castle, to homely wooden chalets in the Saanenland. A close partner and source of both pride and income for the region, the school has made plans to expand and is awaiting final federal approval for its new campus in Schönried.

The views from Le Roseyʼs Alpine campus may be breathtaking, but inside the real inspiration comes from top-notch professors and courses. Students from around the world vie for a spot in this, one of the most exclusive, and expensive, private schools in the world.

For the past 35 years, this educational empire founded in 1880 has been ruled by fourth generation owners and directors Anne and Philippe Gudin. With his charming and surprisingly down-to-earth manner, Gudin gives off the impression of a timeless French actor of the Nouvelle Vague (New Wave) instead of strict director. But son Christophe, beau garcon, has recently taken on the role of adjoint director, waiting his turn to be crowned “King of the Castle”.

Is not easy to have father and son for a double interview: If one is at the winter campus, then the other is in Rolle. If one is testing new students with entrance examinations, the other is meeting with the professors. They both may be multitasking, dedicated globetrotters, but the Gudins are certainly not interchangeable – each brings a unique quality to the role of school director.

Despite their busy schedules, the Gudins were kind enough to sit for an interview with GSTAADLIFE. In the conference room, flanked by a large collage of students in all manner of activity – graduating, racing, winning, performing, like a unique piece of pop art – we caught a glimpse the real Rosey. Top education in a beautiful setting, certainly, but not without a lot of hard work derriere les coulisses, behind the scenes.

.............

GSTAADLIFE: Mr Philippe Gudin, you seem too young to retire. Despite his young age, how is Christophe well poised to take over your role?

Philippe Gudin: It is a job that needs fresh energy, good emotional balance and a lot of imagination. Christophe has all of these qualities.

Christophe Gudin: Actually my father started as director when he was 26 years old. As tradition all the directors from the past started at the same age. So I am 28 years old and a little bit behind …

 

GL: How will the transition to director take place?

CG: During this academic year and next, we will work together on a day-to-day basis. We share the same office and discuss every major decision together. I am also getting to know everyone involved in the Rosey community at large. Responsibilities will be gradually transitioned during those two years and my parents will also always remain available for advice and they will continue lead the board in the following years.

 

GL: Mr (Philippe) Gudin, do you have other children working at Le Rosey?

PG: Our daughter Marie, 25 years old, is Le Roseyʼs event manager. The other two want nothing to do with the school. Olivier works in Asia for Chopard and Laurence owns a publishing house. She is the real intellectual of the family.

 

GL: Le Rosey claims to be a “School for Life” and many Roseans say it’s a family for life. What allows the students to remain so close even years after they have graduated?

CG: A touch of magic! The Rosey spirit has been growing for generations to become the force it is today. Itʼs the fruit of a harmonious balance of different cultures in this international community. We have children from over sixty different countries. Ours was a “global village” long before the invention of Internet.

 

GL: How does the extensive Le Rosey ­network function?

PG: The AIAR (International Association of Roseans) is unique because Roseans keep a very strong link with their friends and their alma mater. The quality and level of trust of the relationships between teachers and Roseans and amongst pupils during their school time is a key ingredient of that success. The move to a very different and bonding experience in Gstaad also creates unique shared memories. This willingness to stay in touch then drives a very useful network with helpful friends all over the world.

 

GL: How many students do you have on your waiting list?

PG: Every year approximately 350 students apply for 90 places at Le Rosey. Let’s say that for every three and half who take the entrance exams, one is admitted.

 

GL: In your opinion, what is the most ­important value to instil in your students?

PG: At Le Rosey we have four core values: Respect, responsibility, commitment and discipline. There is a clear and simple code explained in detail to our pupils from age 8 to 18. Le Rosey is a demanding school with an “open door” policy. The ability to discuss freely guarantees a permanent dialogue.

  

GL: How can this generation compete with fellow youngsters in emerging markets, namely Asia, who are raised with a strong sense of sacrifice and dedication to their studies?

CG: All pupils must dare to succeed, by taking on challenges and pursuing excellence. We teach our students to be curious in all areas of life, and if not to be leaders, then to be good followers!

 

GL: Le Rosey is one of the priciest worldwide. Why is the school so expensive?

PG: Le Rosey is not a luxury school; children are not treated like guests in a hotel. The son of a king is treated with the same respect as the son of anyone else, like all other “normal” students. Our personnel costs are high: We have 250 teachers and staff for 400 students – the teacher to pupil ratio is 1:5. We have a campus of 30 hectares that provides sport and modern facilities. Not to mention Gstaad! We are the only school in the world to have two campuses, which is costly. And yet, we re- invest 95% of our profits in the school to maintain our very high standards.

 

GL: Do you offer scholarships for those who cannot afford tuition?

PG: Yes we do, they are made available through the Rosey Foundation. Every year three to five students are awarded a scholarship; the amount of financial aid is based on the demonstration that parents are not able to meet standard financial obligations.

 

GL: What is your last achievement as director, Mr (Philippe) Gudin?

PG: Le Carnal Hall, the new Learning Centre, will provide first-class amenities for our music, design, art, drama and cooking courses. This includes a 900-seat theatre. It came at a cost of 50 million francs, yet we did not ask a penny from the parents. Alongside using our own resources, we secured bank loans to help bring the project to life. 

For the inaugural concert next October, we’ve invited the Royal London Philharmonic Orchestra. The season will include world-class performances by the Philharmonic St. Petersburg and the Berliner Philharmoniker.

 

GL: And what is your first achievement as director, Mr (Christophe) Gudin? 

CG: Iʼm trying to avoid the mistakes typically associated with my former position as a management consultant and listening before launching any major reform. I already have a few initiatives close to my heart: Iʼve launched cultural days where the entire school lives at the rhythm of a given culture for a few hours; Iʼm also building bridges with more applied sciences by bringing young IT students on campus as well as start-ups.

 

GL: Do you maintain nationality quotas, and if so, why?

PG: We aim to keep a vibrant mix of nationalities and cultures, and therefore limit any one nationality or group of nationalities to 10% of the total student body. Swiss, French and Americans make up this percentage, due to the schoolʼs location, and an old Rosey tradition in America.

 

GL: When will the new campus in Schönried be ready?

PG: We have all the necessary permissions, but a few stubborn neighbours have made official complaints to the Canton of Bern. We are waiting for the appeal. Although it is likely to proceed as planned, but we will refuse to accept any blackmail or pay under the table settlements. But we have already other opportunities, for instance a project in Crans-Montana! It would be a pity, after 100 years in Gstaad

 

GL: With many pupils coming from the world`s wealthiest families, how can Le Rosey teach the value of money?

CG: Sometimes parents compensate for their absence by giving too much, and we fight against this tendency, which is against our principles. So we give every student a reasonable sum of pocket money – the same for everybody.

We also involve the children in our charity work. In Mali, Le Rosey built a school and support 1200 underprivileged children there. Pupils leave Le Rosey having seen first-hand how the less fortunate live, with great respect for people from all walks of life.

 

GL: And our last question, from an admiring student, “Why, Mr Gudin, are you retiring if all the children love you? 

PG: That really touches my heart deeply. When I started I was a big brother for my students. Afterwards, I become a father to them. I want leave before they see me as an old and gaga, as a grandfather. But, attention, achtung! I will always keep an eye on you!

 

 

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 0)

Letter from the Editor--February 2014

 

California Dreamin' on Such a Winter's Day

For the shortest month of the year, February can last a long, long time. Winter has dug in, and spring seems a lifetime away. At least that’s how this California girl feels right about now. 

But the good news is, in Gstaad there’s so much to do inside and out that even if you’re longing for a sandy beach and a margarita, you can sing the cold weather blues right here and have a good time doing it. 

In this edition of GSTAADLIFE, we’ll go behind the scenes at some of the new, old, and potential institutions that make the Saanenland the place to be – no matter what the time of year.

 

Like a Rolling Stone

When you’re in the mood for blues, there’s only one place to go: Le Grand Bellevue, where legendary blues pianist Al Copley is hard at work tickling the ivories for your listening pleasure. Copley is like a fine wine – he just keeps getting better with age. Playing the season here in Gstaad was a welcome home for the celebrated musician, who spent the better part of the 1980s and 90s at the Chesery bar. You can relax in style with his classical and standards repertoire at High Tea in the hotel lounge, or boogie after midnight to 50s and 60s rock hits in the club downstairs. Either way, you’re in the presence of a master – this man can play.  

 

Schoolhouse Rock

By February most kids are sick of school and counting the days until their weeklong ski holiday. But the students lucky enough to attend one of our region’s many private schools don’t have to leave town to enjoy the best in winter fun. That said, riding herd on teenagers is never easy, regardless of the season. In this issue, we talk to the people who run these educational institutions – starting with Director Philippe Gudin and his son Christophe of the world-renowned Le Rosey. Januaria Piromallo had the pleasure of interviewing this father/son “odd couple,” during this exciting time of transition, when Gudin senior will hand the elite boarding school over to Gudin junior. 

Beautiful bovines are nothing new here, so it’s no surprise Gstaad’s “cash cows” are beloved by all. Newest contributor to GSTAADLIFE, Sophie Green, takes a thorough look at the four international private schools that grace the Saanenland. These institutions boost the local economy by drawing in families from around the world, and happily impart a lifelong love of Gstaad on students. 

 

Daydream Believer

Dream big, they say – but how big is too big? The people behind Les Arts Gstaad certainly believe that bigger is better, but critics of the proposed cultural centre insist that both the design and scope of the project will blot out the historic charm of Gstaad. 

Now that municipal and cantonal authorities have given the project a preliminary stamp of approval, we take a serious look at the ambitious project that could secure our region’s future and save us from a Saanenland slump – or fail miserably and have us singing the Saanenland blues for the foreseeable future.

But not everyone believes that Gstaad is in decline. In fact, recent events like the Casiraghi wedding and Madonna’s purchase of a chalet have put the region firmly back on the celebrity magazine maps. Columnist Mandolyna Theodoracopulos explores the popularity of Gstaad, and comes to this conclusion: “If this is what decline looks like, I can’t wait for it to go completely bust.” Amen, Mandolyna. 

 

Hotel California

Believe it or not, this is already our last issue of the season. Never fear, as the season doesn’t officially end until late March, GSTAADLIFE will continue to post articles online at www.gstaadlife.com. While we wait patiently for our new platform and app to be finished, I thank you for bearing with us.

I’m hoping to relax and enjoy the snow through March, at which point I’ll hop a flight with my sights set on that sandy beach and a margarita. But when I’m done trading lakes for the ocean, fondues for tacos, and furs for bikinis, I’ll pack my bags and return to the Saanenland.

Mark my words – I’ll be back!

 

Best regards,

 

Alexis Munier

Editor in Chief

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 3)

Highs of Classical Music at Gstaad's "Sommets Musicaux"

Genova_Dimitrov1_c_DR

Photo: Sommets Musicaux

From January 31st to February 8th, the "Sommets Musicaux" brings beautiful music to the Saanenland. Over nine days, the festival features baroque and classical concerts held in the quaint churches of Gstaad, Rougemont and Saanen. 

This year’s theme, Piano Duos, sees team Genova & Dimitrov serve as mentors to a younger generation of upcoming musicians.  Composer in residence Benjamin Yusupov is also here from his native Tajikistan to present new works.

Concerts include performances by Amsterdam’s Sinfonietta The Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, I Barocchisti, Geneva Camerata.  Diego Fasolis, David Greilsammer, Daniel Hope, Thomas Hampson, Xavier de Maistre, Benjamin Grosvenor, Francesco Piemontesi and Renaud Capuçon aree just some of the soloists who bring their exceptional talent to this 14th annual edition of the festival.

 

For more information and a detailed programme, please visit www.sommets-musicaux.ch.

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 0)

The Making of a Good Ski Instructor

Skischulen_Gstaadsnowsports

 

Photo: AvS

Text: Alexis Munier

 

The only thing harder than learning to ski is finding a good ski instructor to teach you how. In Gstaad, where skiing is a way of life – not to mention livelihood – good ski instructors are as critical to local pride as they are the local economy. 

So forget the Hollywood stereotype of the tanned and good-looking playboy ski instructor known for his expertise on and off the slopes. In real life, the best ski instructors in the Saanenland are smart, multilingual athletes whose teaching skills are as well-honed as their schussing skills. 

 

Setting a High Bar...in Spanish

Many young skiers may dream of becoming instructors, however the race to the finish leaves most dreamers behind. In 2001, the Swiss government raised the bar, requiring that all ski instructors pass a series of exams in order to obtain the license the needed to teach here in Switzerland.

There are other prerequisites as well. As with most hospitality and/or tourism positions in Switzerland, candidates must speak English, French and German at a minimum. Here, in Gstaad, the increase in international tourists has defined the needs of the ski schools as well 

“The ability to speak Spanish would be great asset,” says Jan Brand of Gstaadsnowsports, Gstaad. “Russian would also be an advantage, although many Russians are able to communicate in English. In our school we currently have three teachers who speak the language.”

“Knowledge of Russian would be a real asset,” agrees Marc Rüdisühli of Skischule Alpinzentrum Gstaad, Saanenmöser, “but finding instructors with these skills is difficult.”

 

The Hometown Advantage

Local knowledge is important, which is one of the reasons those raised in the Saanenland represent a majority of the instructors.  Some foreign workers do come to work the winter season; however, their numbers remain minimal.

Important skills like good knowledge of the weather and snow conditions are vital, -especially for guided trips off-piste, where the risk of avalanche is especially high this season.  The instructors must not only be expert skiers, but well-rounded snow sportsmen.

“The guests expect a polyvalent instructor,” states Nicole Haldi, a Gstaad-based private instructor. “He or she must be able to lead a snowshoe tour, beginner’s downhill trip for children, or even a challenging heli-skiing adventure.” 

While good looks aren’t a requirement, looking the part certainly is. 

“An instructor is 50% expertise and 50% personality,” says David Schmid of Pure Snowboarding, Gstaad. “Clients expect snowboarding instructors, especially, to look authentic, not like an actor playing a role.”

 

Sizing Up a Client

Knowing how to teach whom is another key aspect of ski instruction. David Schmid divides guests into three basic categories: 

1. Locals who want to spend a lesson at a fixed time to learn something specific, like snowboarding or raising the level of their downhill skiing abilities; 

2. Tourists or locals who want to achieve the highest amount of progress humanely possible in a short amount of intense training.

3. Prominent individuals who wish a completely customised program tailored to their specific needs and desires.

 

“Young instructors from the Saanenland have a certain advantage,” says Marc Rüdisühli. “They come across as authentic, which the customer really appreciates.”

For some schools like Snowsports Saanenland, the willingness to share in different types of lessons in important as well.  

“We require all our instructors to perform two weekly children’s courses,” says -
Johny Wyssmüller, Snowsports Saanenland, Schönried.  

Marc Rüdisühli on the other hand, recognises the fact that a high skill level of the sport itself does not necessarily make a good teacher, especially for certain customers 

“If a customer brings in his three-year old child, for example,” clarifies Marc Rüdisühli, “It makes little sense to put a high-level instructor on the job, but rather someone of a lower level of training who works well with children.”

“Above all, an instructor must enjoy his work,” says Jan Brand. “Guests notice immediately if someone is truly enthused or if he’s just going about earning his daily bread.”

 

Have Car, Will Ski

There are some things candidates can do to boost their chances of employment as well. Having a vehicle at their disposition means they can pick up customers and drive to different locations. 

The more flexible the better, as working hours are rarely set in stone and cancellations last-minute are commonplace. Instructors may spend several full days working and then have no customers for another several days, depending what that week holds. More and more often, skiers only want to take a lesson in perfect conditions. If the temperature is too cold, the sun isn’t out, or the snow less than powder perfect, students are apt to cancel. 

 

When the Snow Melts....

The winter only lasts so long, and it’s clear that ski instructors must find other work during the rest of the year.  

“I do have a few ski instructors who spend the summer months teaching in New Zealand,” says Marc Rüdisühli, “but this is quite rare.”

For most of the instructors, warm weather means finding another job. Summer often sees the instructors working as tour guides, loggers, construction workers and lifeguards in order to make ends meet. However, they have the off-season to travel, spend time with their families and recover from months of intensive work. But summers aside, being a ski instructor can make every winter a pleasure.

“The good thing about being a ski instructor is that you can do the job for a lifetime,” says Jan Brand. 

“Sure, it can be something of a showman’s job,” chuckles Marc Rüdisühli, “but the teamwork and spending days in the great outdoors has its charm as well.”

 

 

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 0)

Elevation 1049 -- Bringing the Art of Snow and Stone to Life

Cover january

Interview: Alexis Munier

Photo: Tom Haller

 

An Interview with the Curators of Elevation 1049

 

The natural beauty of the Saanenland in winter is the inspiration of the exciting exhibition Elevation 1049. The brainchild of Olympia Scarry and Neville Wakefield, ­Elevation 1049 features the work of Swiss artists, set against their beautiful native Alpine landscape and created in materials inspired by nature – including snow and stone. Curated by Neville and Olympia and produced by the LUMA& Foundation, Elevation 1049 is the first in a series of site-specific exhibitions. 

GSTAADLIFE sat down with the couple to discuss the exhibition and their lives as artists.

Note: Elevation 1049 will be on view from January 27th through March 8th, 2014 and will be free and open to the public.

www.elevation1049.org

 

GSTAADLIFE: Olympia, you’re described as a Swiss artist but have spent most of your life living elsewhere. Tell us about your upbringing and what it feels like to come home to Switzerland, and to Gstaad in particular.

Olympia Scarry: I feel that I’ve led a nomadic existence thus far. My parents, I could say, were in constant search of beauty, which led us to travel and then settle temporarily. We moved like nomads from one landscape to another – in constant migration between the Adriatic and Atlantic coasts. In turn, over the course of my life, I never developed deep roots in any one mainland. I therefore chose a neutral place to call home, a place in which I never really lived. I think this influenced my interest in gathering a focused vision of artists from one land of origin. I’m excited about inviting a new wave of interesting minds to the region.

 

GL: You come from a long line of artists, starting with grandfather and famed children’s book illustrator Richard Scarry. Why did you choose to pursue a career as an artist? Are there any similar qualities that can be found in the work of the three Scarry generations?

OS: I think art is very much about telling stories; stories about the world we live in, and about experiences we variously survive, in turn leaving a marking or record of a specific time and place. My grandfather did so by recording through his drawings and writings the goings-on around him in children’s books such as Busy Busy Town and What Do People do All Day? and diaries from other regions. In the same way, my father continues to do so today through the books he authors, as well as with his own paintings and diaries from other lands such as Diaro Veneziano and Diaro Toscano. I do something similar with sculpture and installation, though the biographical content comes as much through psychology and material as through observation.

  

GL: Neville, is this the first time you’ve worked with Olympia? How exactly did the two of you meet? 

Neville Wakefield: We’ve never collaborated in this way before though I have gone against the grain of impartiality and included Olympia’s work in a couple of shows, testament perhaps to a longstanding  belief that there is no interest without conflict of interest. One such show, titled ‘Involuntary’ was about the idea that most of our interactions with the world are governed by restraint and decorum - the subject of a great deal of art - while those that fall outside the borders of control tend to get neglected.

Olympia’s response was to create a self-portrait, filmed in glacial slow motion, of her own yawn. The fact that she so clearly found it all a bore was instantly endearing. It confirmed everything that I’d felt before, when we met in Venice in 2009 where she had an installation. There, I was instantly attracted to both her and the work and I ended up having long conversations about both. 

 

GL: How does Gstaad compare to your hometown, Neville? 

NW: I grew up in a very small community of less than two thousand people on a secluded offshore island. In some ways it’s probably a bit like Gstaad in that everyone knows everyone else’s business. And even though the English could certainly learn a thing or two from the Swiss in terms of discretion, it was, and still is, a very private place governed as much by the elements as by the people who live there. 

 

GL: The role of curator is a curious one, often misunderstood. What does your job involve and what motivates you?

NW: My background is in philosophy and writing and the kind of curating that I’m interested in draws on both. It’s a delicate

 

1049 features the work of Swiss artists, set against their beautiful native Alpine landscape and created in materials inspired by nature – including snow and stone. Curated by Neville and Olympia and produced by the LUMA& Foundation, Elevation 1049 is the first in a series of site-specific exhibitions. 

GSTAADLIFE sat down with the couple to discuss the exhibition and their lives as artists.

 

Note: Elevation 1049 will be on view from January 27th through March 8th, 2014 and will be free and open to the public.

www.elevation1049.org

GSTAADLIFE: Olympia, you’re described as a Swiss artist but have spent most of your life living elsewhere. Tell us about your upbringing and what it feels like to come home to Switzerland, and to Gstaad in particular.

 

Olympia Scarry: I feel that I’ve led a nomadic existence thus far. My parents, I could say, were in constant search of beauty, which led us to travel and then settle temporarily. We moved like nomads from one landscape to another – in constant migration between the Adriatic and Atlantic coasts. In turn, over the course of my life, I never developed deep roots in any one mainland. I therefore chose a neutral place to call home, a place in which I never really lived. I think this influenced my interest in gathering a focused vision of artists from one land of origin. I’m excited about inviting a new wave of interesting minds to the region.

 

 

GL: You come from a long line of artists, starting with grandfather and famed children’s book illustrator Richard Scarry. Why did you choose to pursue a career as an artist? Are there any similar qualities that can be found in the work of the three Scarry generations?

 

OS: I think art is very much about telling stories; stories about the world we live in, and about experiences we variously survive, in turn leaving a marking or record of a specific time and place. My grandfather did so by recording through his drawings and writings the goings-on around him in children’s books such as Busy Busy Town and What Do People do All Day? and diaries from other regions. In the same way, my father continues to do so today through the books he authors, as well as with his own paintings and diaries from other lands such as Diaro Veneziano and Diaro Toscano. I do something similar with sculpture and installation, though the biographical content comes as much through psychology and material as through observation.

 

GL: Neville, is this the first time you’ve worked with Olympia? How exactly did the two of you meet? 

Neville Wakefield: We’ve never collaborated in this way before though I have gone against the grain of impartiality and included Olympia’s work in a couple of shows, testament perhaps to a longstanding  belief that there is no interest without conflict of interest. One such show, titled ‘Involuntary’ was about the idea that most of our interactions with the world are governed by restraint and decorum - the subject of a great deal of art - while those that fall outside the borders of control tend to get neglected.

Olympia’s response was to create a self-portrait, filmed in glacial slow motion, of her own yawn. The fact that she so clearly found it all a bore was instantly endearing. It confirmed everything that I’d felt before, when we met in Venice in 2009 where she had an installation. There, I was instantly attracted to both her and the work and I ended up having long conversations about both. 

 

GL: How does Gstaad compare to your hometown, Neville? 

NW: I grew up in a very small community of less than two thousand people on a secluded offshore island. In some ways it’s probably a bit like Gstaad in that everyone knows everyone else’s business. And even though the English could certainly learn a thing or two from the Swiss in terms of discretion, it was, and still is, a very private place governed as much by the elements as by the people who live there. 

 

 

GL: The role of curator is a curious one, often misunderstood. What does your job involve and what motivates you?

NW: My background is in philosophy and writing and the kind of curating that I’m interested in draws on both. It’s a delicate -balance because while you hope the end result will articulate a position – in this instance the matrix of relationships between artwork, art, artists and place – the last thing you want as a curator is to be using art to illustrate a thesis. For me, it’s more about creating a platform from which artists can launch their own vision. There’s an underlying structure and thought but it’s the artists who create the narrative that ultimately describes the show. Curating, for me is writing with other means – it’s meant to lead you to unexpected places and results. It should be unpredictable, otherwise it’s just decoration.

 

GL: How did the idea for Elevation 1049 come about?

NW: We wanted to do a show in Gstaad that could in some ways celebrate the history and natural beauty of the place without imposing too much upon it. Michaela and Simon de Pury introduced us to Tracey and Maurice A. Amon and Maja Hoffmann in Venice in 2011.  A number of people with close ties both to Gstaad and contemporary art – Dominique Levy, and Almine and Bernard Ruiz Picasso, later joined by Theresa Sackler and Camilla Al-Fayed, formed an Honorary Board. But the project couldn’t have happened without the support of the LUMA& Foundation’s team, which has produced the show; not to mention the relentless energy and enthusiasm of Maja herself, the Advisory Board, patron, friends and many local partners such as  Gstaad-Saanenland Tourism and the Municipality of Saanen.

 

GL: Why Gstaad as the location for Elevation 1049? 

NW: There were many reasons why Gstaad, all of which start with Olympia’s very close family ties. As the third generation Scarry to live here, she wanted to bring some of the energy of her interests to Gstaad in the same way that her grandparents did in the sixties when the village became the backdrop for the eccentric escapades of the children’s stories we all grew up on. But it’s also an iconic place with a rich social history, an abundance of natural beauty and a few secrets of its own. Those things are inspiration for artists and the natural nutrient for art.

 

GL: What is your vision of Elevation 1049, and why the subtitle ‘Between Heaven and Hell’?

NW: Having become an international currency, it has become increasingly hard to tell whether the art you are looking at is in New York, London, Berlin, Dubai or Shanghai. The idea behind Elevation1049 was to create a type of installation that spoke to the specifics of place – a show that functioned as an antidote to the white-walled hegemony of art-fair circuit. Nearly all of the works in the show grew out of a particular context and are situated outside in nature. Some will melt, others will disappear but they all, in one way or another, speak to mankind’s relationship to terrain – to the ground beneath our feet and the sky above. What we see below and above us is the Heaven and Hell of the subtitle. In his most famous song, Roger Waters of Pink Floyd - who spend time in Gstaad - wrote the lyrics, “So you think you can tell Heaven from hell, blue skies from pain”. The song was “Wish you were Here”.

 

GL: Tell us about the artists who will be showcasing work at the exhibition. Are they the “Who’s Who” of contemporary Swiss work or up-and-coming young artists?

NW: When you invite artists to participate in a show you don’t necessarily know who is going to be inspired. What’s amazing about this project was that almost without exception all the artists we approached agreed to participate. As a result we ended up with an incredibly strong representation of artists, many of whom have really played a key role in shaping Swiss art of the last few decades. But, alongside the veterans there are also many younger and emerging artists like Beni Hegglin (here collaborating with Tina Braegger) who at the age of 25 is the youngest and just beginning to show his work.

 

GL: Olympia, can you tell us about your installation?

OS: I will be presenting a minimal installation of a home that will never be built, that eventually will collapse and disappear. It’s equally a dream home that never comes to fruition and the dream of a home. It exists as a skeleton to be fleshed out in the mind. Constructed on unstable ground, I invite the earth to rebel against it and with it all the mindless damage that construction imposes on the world. The title – All that is Solid Melts into Air – to me suggests that all mankind’s endeavors are forever in conflict with nature. And so we are left always on the outside looking in. 

 

GL: What can Elevation 1049 bring to Gstaad, a village known mostly for its glitz and glamour?

NW: Gstaad may be known mostly for its glitz and glamour but perhaps interestingly, that aspect was not what most of the artists were drawn to. Christian Marclay, for instance, chose to look at how the Saanenland has been seen through the lens of another culture – in this instance Bollywood films. Other artists such a Thomas Hirschhorn or Claudia Comte have chosen to create works with snow and ice as it is used in everyday ways around farms and on the ice rink. What we hope Elevation 1049 brings to Gstaad is another perception that perhaps goes beyond the stereotype – one in which glitz and glamour can be seen as just one surface facet of a much richer and more varied totality.

 

GL: Do you have any estimate of the number of visitors expected to attend?

NW: We don’t have an estimate for the number of visitors expected to attend though with an exhibition that is intentionally decentered and in a place that is not easy to access there’s a certain threshold of commitment that people have to pass in order to see it. That said, it’s been very important to us that the show is free to the public and that it is as accessible for local people as it is for art-world globetrotters and their attendant Sherpas. And for those who would rather let their fingers do the walking there’s always the website: www.elevation1049.org 

 

GL: Olympia, will you pass on a love on the Saanenland to future generations of the Scarry family?

OS: I do hope so!

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 0)

Ski Bunnies & Other Mythical Creatures

Lfte ski

Photo: Fotolia

 

Letter from the Editor

The snow has arrived again after a long pause.  Just in time for me to don a new pair of skis and try to not break both my legs.Readers, be warned – if you see me on the slopes, avoid me like the plague. 

 

I Came, I Saw, I Skied

I’ve skied once every five years for the past 35 years. Which makes me a permanent beginner rather than a ski bunny – and a great annoyance to many a friend stuck ‘babysitting’ me on the green slopes. I can barely manage to walk in 3-inch heels, so the idea of strapping two smooth pieces of wood (what are skies made out of these days anyway?) to my feet and descending a mountain is absolutely frightening. There is nothing more demotivating than watching a herd of four-year olds cruise past me at breakneck speeds. But for someone whose idea of a big thrill is a book and a bubble bath, my pathetic km per hour ratio is justified. After all, Gstaad’s slogan is “Come up, Slow down”! 

Special thanks to the kind souls who found my poles and skis and delivered them to me after I slid down half of the Horneggli on my back, and to the chairlift operator who saved me from being trampled after a nasty fall in the turnstiles. 

Next time, I’ll be wise enough to enlist the help of one of the region’s many fabulous ski instructors.  This issue takes a look at several local ski schools and what it takes to make a good ski instructor. Languages, regional knowledge and expert sportsmanship are just a few of the talents needed to succeed in this challenging career.

 

Dogs and Tigers and Bären, Oh My

Our Local News section opens with a short article on the newly re-opened Bären Gsteig Hotel & Restaurant.  Charming young couple Anne-Sophie Jaggi and Lukas Gasser have brought the old “bear” back to life with a surprisingly warm and modern atmosphere.  

They say dogs are man’s best friend and Last Word columnist M. Theodoracopulos agrees.  Her look into platonic relationships may make you examine how many of those Facebook friends truly deserve that title – and how many should be swapped out for the more reliable canine variety. 

Speaking of friends, visit our Gstaad Gift Guide if that special someone expects an exquisitely wrapped box on Valentine’s Day. With gifts in several price ranges, you’ll find fresh ideas for the man or woman you think has it all – including you! 

 

Love, Art and Hospitality

A love of the Saanenland has kept the Scarry family here for three generations.  Now artist Olympia Scarry and partner Neville Wakefield have brought a love of their own to the region – contemporary art.  As curators of the new exhibition Elevation 1049, they have attracted the best contemporary Swiss artists to create spectacular works in and around our beautiful white winter landscape. 

In celebration of Valentine’s Day, we’re honouring the local couple whose love bloomed at work – and whose work bloomed at Hotel Christiania. Known for its unique blend of Swiss hospitality and Middle Eastern flavour, the popular hotel and restaurant reflects the good taste and great stewardship of this multicultural couple. Not to mention our hats are off to any dynamic duo who can work and live together in such harmony.

Happy Valentine’s Day to Nagy Geadah and Isabelle Geadah-Nopper – and to everyone in the Saanenland! 

You’ve stolen my heart. Now if only I could ski….

 

Best regards,

 

Alexis Munier

Editor in Chief

 

 

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 0)

Second Ambulance Now in Service for Winter 2013-2014 Season

Rettungsdienst_0211

 Photo: AvS

Air Glaciers has confirmed it will again operate services during the 2013 – 2014 winter season. 

Ambulance service last year included a second vehicle which was entirely financed by the “Friends of Saanan Hospital” group. This year, the Municipality of Saanen has been asked to contribute equally. The total of maintaining a second ambulance is expected to have fixed costs upwards of 120,000 CHF.

“We are convinced of the need for a second ambulance after going over last year’s summary report,” says Daniel Matti, Vice President of “Friends of of Saanen Hospital”.

The primary ambulance will, as customary, be stationed in Saanenmöser, while the second will be stationed in the former Saanen Hospital which ceased operations last year. This central location will cater to the large winter tourist population in the Gstaad-area. The ambulance will bring patients to Zweisimmen Hospital, the closest cantonal option.

Though only 10 kilometres from Saanen, reaching Zweisimmen Hospital in winter requires an approximately 20 – 30 minute drive over the often-treacherous Saanenmöser pass.

 

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 1)

Le Rosey Gains Another Approval on Road to Expansion

In the latest move toward Institut Le Rosey’s campus expansion, the Canton of Bern has given long-awaited approval on the building site permit and street renovation.

In April 2013, voters here in the Saanenland approved the plans for reconstructing Hubelstrasse, the street running up to the proposed campus. Hubelstrasse, which no longer meets current safety requirements, will be widened and repaved to accommodate the expected increase in pedestrian and motor traffic, including space for passing agricultural vehicles. 

 

Erli bird catches the worm

At that time, Erli, the future campus location and building site, was also given the go ahead by the public. The applications were then sent for approval by the Canton, which had to take into account the many objections filed against the project. 

The objections stem mostly from the households in the immediate region and large Swiss organisations which protect the environment. Many objectors would prefer that Schönried, with its small village core in the valley, be the site. Many also disapprove of the plan to transform what is now undeveloped land into commercial property. 

 

A Rosey by any other name 

Defenders of the project say the compound would be no different than a luxury hotel complex in size and look. Le Rosey’s new campus will also serve as the housing site for all male students, who are currently based in Gstaad. When completed, individual chalets in a small village-like setting.will host the entire student body. Male students will continue to board in Gstaad itself at the Sportzentrum until the new campus and residences are finished.

The elite boarding school has been active in Gstaad during the winter season for over 100 years, and maintains close ties with the Saanenland. Proponents say that keeping the school as a partner in the region is essential for the local economy and tourism industry.

 

Worst case scenario

The last step before construction can begin in earnest may very well be the Swiss Federal Court, if opponents wish to continue their fight to stop the project.

 

What do you think? What do you think? (Comments 0)



Other recent articles


The Prosts--The Family That Races Together Stays Together
Last Word Column: Mandolyna Theodoracopulos
Ebnit Offers New Hope for Locals Priced Out of Housing Market
The New Gstaad Winter Games--As Much Fun Indoors As Out
Molkerei Approves Land Purchase for Building Construction
Saving the Bergbahnen--Three Possibilities
The Life and Times of Brigitta Notz
Letter from the Editor, December: 'Tis the Busy Season
Parkhaus Saanen Finally Open for Business
Letter from the Editor -- November 2013
Bi-Annual Gstaadermesse Runs October 24-27, 2013
The Queen's Players
A Little Bit Country, a Little Bit Rock and Roll at Country Night Gstaad
Come Fatto Da Mamma: Family-Style Italian Trattoria Opens in Rougemont
Gstaad Yacht Club Summer Season Highlights
The Saanenland’s Off-Season? What Off-Season?
Bidding on Bessie: Cash Cows at Alp Gumm's Annual Auction
You Are Where You Eat
Playing Catch-Up With Hamburger Pianist Sebastian Knauer
On the Cashmere Catwalk with Alessandra Vicedomini

Search this site


Advertisement

ABOUT US

GstaadLife is the exclusive monthly publication about the good life in Gstaad. We’re the only magazine covering local news, arts and entertainment, events, business, the great outdoors and style in the region, in English. Whether you’re in town for the weekend, the season or the rest of your life, there is something for everyone at GstaadLife.
Local Adsearch
Anzeiger von Saanen
Using AvS-AdSearch you will find all the current local ads from the Anzeiger von Saanen, as well as thousands of other offers from all over Switzerland.


Property
Property
Latest property in our area to rent


Latest property in our area to buy

Jobs
Jobs
Latest jobs in our area

Vehicles
Vehicles
Latest offers in our area

The Rest
The Rest
Latest offers

Search other ads Search other ads
(e.g. events, services, used goods etc)

Categories

 |

Archives

 

Latest Updates: AvS.ch

Latest News from Anzeiger von Saanen

Latest Comments: AvS.ch

Latest Comments on Anzeiger von Saanen

Latest Updates: Swisster

Swisster

Latest Updates: SwissInfo

Link to SwissInfo

Latest Updates: BBC News

BBC News

Other Delivery options

Club Area

Gstaad Yacht ClubEagle Ski Club

GstaadLife Print Edition

GstaadLife is Gstaad’s first and only weekly magazine in English. Appears once a week in the winter and summer high seasons.

Archive (PDF)
Subscribe
Advertise
Contact us

History of GstaadLife

GstaadLife.com and the GstaadLife print edition are the English-language sister publications to the German-language Anzeiger von Saanen. The print edition was launched on February 3 2004, with the website first appearing in August 2006. GstaadLife.com and the GstaadLife print edition have a separate editorial team from the Anzeiger von Saanen, with some articles in GstaadLife publications being translations of items that appeared in the Anzeiger von Saanen. The Anzeiger von Saanen has been printed in Saanen and Gstaad since 1880, and is the leading source of local news coverage for the area known as Saanenland, which includes Gstaad and surrounding areas of the western Bernese Oberland in the Swiss Alps. GstaadLife.com, GstaadLife, and the Anzeiger von Saanen are all publications of Müller Marketing und Druck AG. For additional information about the publications, please contact Müller Marketing und Druck AG at the address below:

PO Box 201, Kirchstrasse
3780 Gstaad, Switzerland

Tel: +41.33.748 88 74
Fax: +41.33.748 88 84

Email: produktion -at- mdruck.ch

Useful numbers

  • Emergencies
  • Police
  •  
  • Fire
  • Ambulance
  • Alpine rescue
  • Car accident service (24/7)
  • Medical emergency Gstaad-Saanen
  • Medical emergency Pays d’Enhaut
  • Dental emergency weekends
  •  
  • Hospitals
  • Saanen
  • Zweisimmen
  • Château-d'Oex
  •  
  • Pharmacies
  • Apotheke Kropf, Gstaad
  • Capitol Apotheke im Gstaaderhof, Gstaad
  • Pharmacie Victor Haroun, Château-d'Oex
  •  
  • Vets
  • Dr méd. vét. Jean-P. Lenoir, Château-d'Oex
  • Dr. med. vet. Felix Neff, Saanen
  • Tierärztliches Zentrum Arche, Saanen
  •  
  • 117, 112 or
  • 033 356 84 31
  • 118
  • 144
  • 14 14
  • 033 744 88 80
  • 0900 57 67 47
  • 026 923 43 50
  • 033 748 02 00
  •  
  •  
  • 033 748 02 00
  • 033 729 26 26
  • 026 923 43 43
  •  
  •  
  • 033 748 86 26
  • 033 744 53 60
  • 026 924 64 13
  •  
  •  
  • 026 924 64 22
  • 033 744 35 31
  • 033 744 06 61